Using the Boost air pressure technology

Alternative Uses for the Boost

The Boost air pressure technology can be helpful in many aspects besides just rehabilitation. In fact, it can be used for anything from aiding weight loss efforts to alleviating symptoms of chronic conditions and aging.


Weight Loss

The Facts

  • From 1999 –2000 through 2017 –2018, The US obesity prevalence increased from 30.5% to 42.4%1
  • Obesity-related conditions that are among the leading causes of preventable, premature death include heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer1  
  • Individuals carrying excess weight are at an increased risk of workout injury due to increased torque on weight-bearing joints such as the knees and ankles2

How the Boost can help

It is becoming increasingly important to address the steady incline in obesity levels over the years, not just from a weight loss standpoint but from an overall health and disease-risk standpoint as well. When it comes to weight loss, exercise is one of the highest priorities other than nutrition and diet. However, most cardio equipment you’ll see in the average gym is not necessarily inclusive towards heavily obese individuals who may have difficulty walking. That’s where the Boost come in. By allowing the user to exercise at a fraction of his or her body weight, the air pressure technology makes it easier to walk while also decreasing the risk for injury during exercise by reducing excess stress on bones and joints.


Chronic Conditions

The Facts

  • About 1 in 4 US adults (58.5 million people) have doctor-diagnosed arthritis3
  • Arthritis is more common in adults who do not meet physical activity recommendations (23.1%) compared with adults who are sufficiently active (18.1%)3
  • About 43.5% of the 58.5 million adults with arthritis are limited in their regular activities because of their arthritis3
  • Exercise increases strength and flexibility, reduces joint pain, and helps combat fatigue in those with arthritis4
  • About 54 million Americans have low bone density or osteoporosis, and about 50% of women and up to 25% of men over age 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis5  

How the Boost can help

Joint pain, limited range of motion and fatigue are just a few of the symptoms that can make it difficult for those suffering from arthritis to meet physical activity recommendations. Ironically, however, exercise is a crucial factor in alleviating those same symptoms. So, the key is to find a way to exercise without pain. With the Boost technology, those with arthritis or other chronic conditions have the opportunity to exercise and increase cardio fitness without pain by reducing impact on joints.

In addition, the prevalence of osteoporosis and its direct correlation to stress/exercise-related injuries presents a need for the Boost unweighting technology as well. By once again reducing impact on bones, those with osteoporosis can exercise without the risk of stress fractures that could arise from walking or running at full weight capacity.


Aging

The Facts

  • Falls are the leading cause of injury and injury death in older adults age 65+6
  • Over 95% of hip fractures in older adults are due to falls, usually from falling sideways6
  • Benefits of exercise for seniors and aging adults include disease prevention, improved mental health, decreased risk of falls, and improved cognitive function7

How the Boost can help

As coordination and balance decline with age, exercise becomes increasingly difficult and injuries more likely. However, the benefits listed above highlight the sheer importance of exercise in older adults. This presents yet another gap that can be filled by the Boost technology. With the Boost shorts being zipped into the machine itself, it provides a safe support system where the individual can focus on exercising without worrying about falling and injuring themselves.


Sources

1. https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html

2. https://obesitymedicine.org/obesity-and-exercise/

3. https://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/data_statistics/national-statistics.html

4. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/arthritis/in-depth/arthritis/art-20047971

5. https://www.nof.org/preventing-fractures/general-facts/

6. https://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/falls/adultfalls.html